raymond

Copyright 2014 Michael Grant de Longueuil

Contact email: dr.mcgrant141@btinternet.com

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Visit French website: www.delongueuil.com

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A unique form of printmaking, monotypes are made by drawing or painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface. The surface, or matrix, was historically a copper etching plate, but in contemporary work it can vary from zinc or glass to acrylic. The image is then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together. Monotypes can also be created by inking an entire surface and then, using brushes or rags, removing ink to create a subtractive image eg creating lights from a field of opaque colour.  Monotyping produces a unique work or art and although subsequent reprintings are sometimes possible, they differ greatly from the first print and are generally considered inferior.

What is a Monotype?

Raymond's monotyping technique involved painting on a plate in different colors (not black ink) and with oil lying gasoline. His method is the same technique used by DEGAS in the fall of 1890 to carry out his series of colorful landscapes. Raymond produced hundreds of free and spontaneous monotypes with white colours exploding in a light nature.

Like the great artists GOYA, and especially GAUGUIN and DEGAS (who has directed several hundreds of monotypes in black & white and colour), Raymond de LONGUEUIL implemented a considerable number of monotypes during eight years of reserach and hard work.

Raymond de Longueuil's technique:

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Raymond produced hundreds of free and spontaneous monotypes with white colours exploding in a light nature.